My Top 20 Halloween Picks, For Kids!

halloween-pumpkin-wallpaper-halloween-backgrounds-halloween-pumpkin-background-26040

Fall is my favorite time of year!  Not only do I love the season and all of the approaching Holidays, but it is also a time that fills me with creative energy.  I am already working on Christmas presents and Halloween hasn’t even arrived!  I am, however, actively looking up amazing Halloween ideas for you and will be compiling lists of my absolute favorite costumes, wigs, hats, masks, and decorations that are not only FREE but should also be easy enough to finish in time for Trick-or-Treating.

Halloween is definitely all about the kids so that’s what today’s TOP HALLOWEEN PICKS for KIDS will cover (20 TOTAL!!!).

I’ve always loved Red Riding Hood, probably because I love RED… so you can imagine just how pleased I was to find this adorable cape AND wolf hat inspired by the fairytale.  The pattern is available HERE from Red Heart Yarns.

© 2011 Coats & Clark

© 2011 Coats & Clark

I have two little boys, otherwise I might never have known the joys of The Legend of Zelda video game.  If you love Zelda too, you will love this ADORABLE Link costume for baby.  It is from Joanna Rankin and is available as a free download on Ravelry HERE.

© Lysiane

© Lysiane

Who doesn’t love a little Minion?  These hats are from Crochet by Jennifer and are available as a FREE Ravelry download HERE.

© Jennifer Dougherty

© Jennifer Dougherty

Disney’s Frozen is a big hit right now, and I am sure this Elsa inspired braid hat will be a huge hit as well.  It is from Amber Simmons and is available HERE.

© rick•a•bam•boo

© rick•a•bam•boo

Everyone had a Cabbage Patch Kid at some point, now you can have a real one!  Check out this AWESOME Cabbage Patch wig from Dearest Debi available HERE.

© Dearest Debi

© Dearest Debi

What better way to keep your little one’s head warm than in the mouth of a SHARK?  This one is from Sarah Zimmerman of Repeat Crafter Me and is available HERE.

© Sarah Zimmerman

© Sarah Zimmerman

SHUT THE FRONT DOOR!!!  How adorable is this baby COW BOY costume?  It’s from Busting Stitches and is available HERE.

© Unfuzzy Boutique

© Unfuzzy Boutique

The ever popular MARIO & LUIGI!  Not only are these hats awesome, but finding a Mario or Luigi hat is not easy (surprisingly, I’ve tried).  Add some thrift store overalls and a red or green t-shirt and you’ve got a great, inexpensive costume! These are from Laura Michels and are available HERE.

© chacha13

© chacha13

Does your kid love Harry Potter too?  Here is an INCREDIBLE Sorting Hat from Allison Hoffman available HERE.

© Allison Hoffman

© Allison Hoffman

I love this Peter Pan inspired hat, it would also be great for Oktoberfest!  It’s from Christiana Brenna and is available HERE.

PetaPan

Here’s a great Pirate Hat from Spud & Chloe available HERE, Arrrr!

Spud&Chloe

Spud&Chloe

The annual visit to the pumpkin patch wouldn’t be complete without a PUMPKIN HAT for your pumpkin!  This one is from Cathy Kurtz and is available HERE.

© CatLuke

© CatLuke

This is sure to not only get a bunch of laughs, but also to keep baby’s face nice and warm on a cold October night!  Check out this HILARIOUS Bearded Baby Hat by Ashlee Marie, available HERE.

Ashlee Marie

Ashlee Marie

Got a very hungry newborn baby?  HERE is a too cute for words Very Hungry Caterpillar hat and cocoon from Melody Adams.

© Melody Adams

© Melody Adams

Want to keep baby’s feet nice and toasty in pure Monster style?  HERE are some fuzzy baby monster booties from Needyl.

Needyl

Needyl

Kitty cats are always adorable on Halloween, HERE is a sweet hat and mitt set from The Craft Frog.

The Craft Frog

The Craft Frog

HOO likes Owls?  HERE is a cute Owl set for your little bird, from Red Heart Yarn.

Red Heart

Red Heart

Want something your little girl can ROCK all year too?  HERE is a super sweet Skull Jumper from Malia Mather.

© maliamather

© maliamather

I absolutely LOVE Shrek!  Dayna Forrester does too, check out this Baby Ogre Hat she designed!  Available HERE.

© daysi

© daysi

And finally, something spooky for your kids to carry all their goodies in!  The I Want My Mummy candy bucket from Crochet Dude Drew Emborsky!  Available HERE.

The Crochet Dude

The Crochet Dude

So there you have my TOP (20) HALLOWEEN PICKS for KIDS!!!  I hope I have helped inspire you with some fun creative ideas!  I’ll be posting more of my favorites for Halloween pets, adults, and decoration ideas soon.  Enjoy and… 

 

 

 

 

The Aidez

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

In my last post I told you about my Fall sweater fever!  I get it every year around August; when the first christmas catalogs start arriving with images of breathtaking Irish Aran knit sweaters are thrown in my face!  When I see these fall sweaters I imagine myself trick-or-treating on a crisp Halloween with my kids, cozying up to a delicious turkey dinner, and lounging with my family on Christmas morning wearing something that declares how much I love this time of year!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

When I saw the Aidez pattern by Cirilia Rose, I knew instantly this was going to be my go-to Fall comfort sweater!  I never imagined I would be able to knit an Aran for myself, I always thought it would be way to complicated with all of the cables and what not.  This was not the case… The Aidez is knit on larger needles using bulky yarn so it goes very quickly.  Also, the pattern was written pretty well with only a few minor confusing points.  I guarantee you can make this sweater too, and I hope you do!  Did I mention it’s FREE?

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

The pattern calls for Berroco Peruvia Quick yarn and size 10.5 straight needles.  I chose to use Lion Brand Fisherman’s Wool (in Oatmeal) held doubled on the same size needles… I definitely recommend using a lighter solid color so that the cables and stitch details show.  I also knit mine up a size, normally I am a small but wanted a very roomy feel to this particular sweater.  Like I mentioned, for the most part the pattern was very easy to follow.  The only part that was somewhat confusing to me (as well as some others) was the ‘right cross-stich cable‘ and ‘left cross-stitch cable.’  The part that confused me in particular was the wording for how to twist the stitches on the right cross.  For others, it was remembering to drop the extra added wrap.  So, pay close attention to this part of the pattern, and don’t forget when you add the extra wraps, you will need to drop those wraps the next row.

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

For how large this sweater is, it only took me about a week to complete which is phenomenal!  I love how quickly the chunky yarn and larger needles made this go…  also I love the fact that wool I used is water resistant, 100% virgin wool!  This sweater is definitely warm, I absolutely love it and I am so proud that I was able to make it for myself.  I hope you will try it yourself, enjoy!

 

My Miette

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

Hello again!  I’ve had a whirlwind summer here with a potential move that caused a LOT of disruption in my ability to focus on my fiber arts… I probably should not have packed at all, and just continued to knit!  Regardless,  It’s September and I have that itch I get every year around this time.  Fall is in the air and I have sweater fever!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

The first one I made is a gorgeous, classic, cropped cardigan called Miette which was designed by Andi Satterlund.  Seriously, go on Ravelry and check out this woman’s designs… they are filled with vintage charm and elegance!  This one was of course FREE, but I plan on purchasing more of her patterns simply because this one was so well written.  Note:  I will do my second Fall sweater in the next post.

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

Seeing Andi’s shockingly beautiful RED miette, I knew mine had to be the same!  I found a lightweight cotton at Michaels, which was amazing because most craft stores around here carry very little cotton based yarn selections!  The yarn was Premier Yarns Cotton Fair (52% Cotton 48% Acrylic).  This yarn actually was a little bit too fine for the pattern, a size 2 yarn but I couldn’t tell looking at it (as the yarn size was hidden on the inside of the ball band).  But I adjusted for this by knitting a size larger than I normally would and it came out perfect!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

As I mentioned, the pattern was very easy to follow!  I did encounter one major disaster on my first round making it… I had knit all the way to the bottom lace edging of the sweater and realized my lace wasn’t right! Word to the wise, no more than one glass of wine while knitting lace.  I cried, then put my big girl pants back on and started over the next day.  My second try went swimmingly, the only error I made was when joining for one of my sleeves.  I must have twisted the stitches, so there is this small ridge on the sleeve but it’s not too noticeable when worn (other than by myself).  It was too late to go back when I noticed it and I couldn’t handle having to frog the entire thing again.  So please, be more careful than I!  I was more aware on my second sleeve and did not make the same mistake.

Arm damage!  © positivelylace

Arm damage! © positivelylace

A lot of you have been commenting that you would like more video tutorials for the patterns I have worked on!  Please know that this is something I would really like to do, and I am working on getting a decent video camera to make that a reality.  Until then,  Gail Dokucu made some videos for a Miette KAL (knit along) which are extremely helpful!  She only recorded for sleeves and button band, not the entire sweater… but it is still worth watching.  I’ll post the first for the sleeves and button band tutorials, you can click through her videos to watch the others.

Give this amazing sweater a try, it’s perfect for this end of Summer/early Fall weather right now and it knits up rather quickly!  Enjoy!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

Crochet Baby Tutu

TuTu Cute!

IMG_0702

I love making baby stuff, especially baby girl stuff!  Lately I have been seeing a lot of tutu’s floating around online and have decided to make up my own pattern for them.  I originally thought I could possibly sell the pattern, but after giving it more thought I realized that I’m not very good at writing up patterns still… so these will be free for anyone who wishes to try them.  The instructions are very similar to that of my White Russian skirt instructions, you basically want to know the measurements of the child and adjust the pattern accordingly.

IMG_0694

What you need:

  • Medium sized yarn (4) in your choice of color.  I used Caron Simply Soft (one skein)
  • Ribbon yarn (one skein each tutu).  I used both Red Heart Boutique Sashay and Patons Pirouette ribbon yarn, any type  you like will do.
  • H/8 (5.00mm) crochet hook, or whichever size you prefer.
  • Ribbon for the corset style lace-up back

Measurements to take:

  • Chest circumference 
  • Length of chest from under-arm to waist (this will be how long you make the top part of the tutu… at the waist is where you will want to start the ruffles)
  • Length from the waist to where you want the tutu to end… I like it to go just below the diaper so it looks more like a tutu, but you can make a full length dress if you want
  • Chest at underarm to shoulder… how long you want the straps to be (I made mine tie straps to be more adjustable)

Bodice

I used a basic crochet shell stitch for the bodice of the tutu, and I crocheted it flat so that I could lace up the back (making it look more like a tutu, and also more adjustable).

The shell stitch is a multiple of 6 plus an extra 2… so make  your chain in multiples of 6 until you reach the chest circumference measurement, then add 2 extra chains.

Row 1: 1 SC in the 2nd chain from hook. SK 2 CH, Shell (5 DC) in next chain,  SK 2 CH, SC in next chain. Continue across. At the end, CH3 and turn.

Row2: 2 DC in same sc as turning CH 3, *SC in 3rd DC in next shell.  SK next 2 DC and 5 DC in next SC. REP from * across.

Row 3: CH 1, turn, 1 SC in the same stitch. 5 DC in the next SC,
SC in the 3rd DC of the next shell. Continue across. At the end, SC in top of the ch 3 turn of previous row.
Here is an image I found online to help you if you need it… it’s a very basic pattern
Basic crochet shell pattern

Basic crochet shell pattern

You will continue this pattern until your top is as long as the underarm to waist measurement.  Tie off the yarn and proceed to crochet the mesh underskirt which you will then attach the ribbon yarn to.

Mesh Underskirt

Lay bodice flat (wrong side facing) with the shells facing up and fold the sides to meet in the center.  Join yarn in bottom corner of right side, ch 5, join to other side of corset back in bottom corner.

Row 1: Ch 4, sk a ch on bodice, dc in next ch, ch 1… across bodice.  Join with a sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch 4.

Row 2: Ch 4, sk ch, dc in next dc, ch 1, repeat across and join with a sl st in 3rd ch of beg ch 4.

Row 3: (Increase Row) Ch 4, dc in same st, ch 1, dc in next dc.  Do another 3 increases evenly along this row (making a dc ch1 dc in the same dc).  Join with a sl st in 3rd ch of beg ch 4.

Repeat row 2 and/or add another increase row (or couple of them) to desired length of skirt… you can customize it any way you want.  Tie off yarn and proceed to add ribbon yarn to the mesh skirt.   It should look like this up to this point (sorry I meant to take more pictures of the process, but it’s pretty simple).

IMG_0642

Tutu

This part is pretty tricky to explain in writing… here is a YouTube tutorial that shows the basics of joining and using the ribbon yarn.  But see my instructions below the video for this particular skirt before you begin to join.

For this particular skirt, I recommend joining to each dc of the mesh skirt, and then doing a ch 1 of the ribbon, join to next dc, all around the skirt.  

For the first row, try to join where the bodice and the mesh skirt meet, so that way you don’t have the mesh showing through.  I did NOT fasten off each row of ribbon, I just made a ch 1 at the end of each row, then began working in the next row below.  When you are done you should fasten off, then secure the ribbon yarn to the mesh skirt really well (you can use the piece of yarn left from when you fastened off the mesh part of the skirt).  Here are some pictures:

 

 

Straps

You can use ribbon if you want for the straps, I just joined my yarn and chained to the desired length.

Lace Up

I attached my ribbon to the top of the tutu, just pull it through the spaces on the side edges, and lace it all the way down to the tutu.

That’s it!  This tutu was really simple to make, joining the ribbon yarn is a bit tedious… but it looks so cute!  I hope you and your little ballerina enjoy this pattern!!

Handsome Little Boy Vest

Little Fella’s

©positivelylace

©positivelylace

It’s not often that I make something for little boys.  Even though I have two of my own, they don’t really get super excited about a hand-knit or crocheted item (except for minion hats which I swear I will get to at some point!).  Case in point, here is my five year old trying on the knit vest…

Austin modeling the vest ©positivelylace

Austin modeling the vest ©positivelylace

Regardless, I had recently met this AMAZING woman through one of my groups on facebook.  She is so incredibly kind and sends massive amounts of alpaca wool (from her own farm, Liberty Hill Farm)  for me to spin FREE!!  I in turn send her something that I have knit or crocheted, it’s a win-win situation as we call it.  She has a little grandson also, so I wanted to make something special that he could wear to family gatherings, Church, or even just playing around the house and this little vest was just what I was looking for.

The FREE knitting pattern is called A Little Textured Vest from Joji Locatelli,  and it was really straightforward and easy to knit up.  It is knit in two pieces but can easily be adjusted to knit in the round.  For my vest I used Wool Ease yarn in Oxford Grey (about a ball and a half) as well as US 6 and US 7 needles.  Her grandson is about to turn 3 so I made him the size 4 to give him room to grow (it even fit my very small 5 year old son).  The only thing I changed was which side of the vest was “right side“… I liked the look of the wrong side better so I flipped them around when I seamed the vest.

©positivelylace

©positivelylace

The vest turned out SO CUTE, and was a perfect reminder that even knitting for boys can be adorable and fun!  She loved the vest and it felt so nice to make such a sweet person so happy.  I hope you will try out this vest pattern for your little man as well!  Enjoy!

Austin modeling the vest ©positivelylace

Austin modeling the vest ©positivelylace

The Naughty Deer Hat

Naughty Naughty!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

A while ago I was browsing through my knitting pages on Facebook and I came across a hat.  It was so pretty… fair isle knitted with these cute reindeer on it!  The girl who had made the hat had casually asked us in the group if we thought the “stars” in the background were “too much” … and I did not even SEE it until I looked at the comments for the hat.  The deer, they are making a Bambi!

I knew instantly I had to make this hat!  For that rugged, bearded, brawny woodsman of a man in my life… er, if I had one haha.  I’m not going to lie, I would totally make this hat for myself and rock it!  However, I have two children under the age of 10 and I think the other moms might think their childish behavior is a result of my parenting style (giggles).

So I made this hat for my friend Andrew, of course, after carefully removing the “male” antlers from the female deer in the pattern.

Original chart showing the female deer with antlers © positivelylace

Original chart showing the female deer with antlers
© positivelylace

Here is how I made the female deer less "male" :) © positivelylace

Here is how I made the female deer less “male” :)
© positivelylace

The basic chart pattern is from Anne Rutten and is called the Fornicating Deer Chart (click the link to get the chart).  I made the hat with the chart as follows:

For this hat I used Wool-Ease Solids yarn in Oxford Grey for the main color, and Vicki Howell’s Sheep(ish) yarn in white-ish for the contrast color.

Using  size 2 (2.75mm) circular needles for the ribbing, and size 6 (4.0mm) circulars and DPN’s (double pointed needles) for the remainder of the hat.

CO 96 sts (main color, smaller needles)

work 1.5″ 2×2 ribbing

K one row, change to larger needles

K 33 rows of the chart pattern via fair isle (stranded knitting) technique (towards the end I added in some intermittent stars to break up my long strands, you can do this too if you like though it’s not necessary)

Begin decreasing by:

K6, K2Tog knit any extra stitches left before marker at end of round.
Knit next row all the way around.
K5, K2Tog
Knit next row all the way around

Continue to decrease in this manner until last row is K2tog all the way around. When left with approximately 8 stitches on needle, run yarn through stitches and pull through center opening

Sew in your loose ends

Here is a link to help you understand Fair Isle knitting if  you are new to it like I was.  Below you can see how I held my two strands of yarn and only picked up the color I needed for each stich, below that you can see how the other yarn will become “stranded” behind the knitted work (as seen from the backside of your work).  

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

This hat was a blast to knit, and I’m really happy that my friend liked it.  I hope you will give this hat a try as well!  Enjoy!

Dying Yarn and Roving… With Kool-Aid!

Fun with Kool-Aid!

Google Image, KoolAid Logo

Google Image, KoolAid Logo

It’s been a while since my last blog… I’ve been knitting, designing knits, and I’ve also been making my very own homespun yarn!  I can’t express the SATISFACTION that I get as a crafty person/crocheter/knitter… that comes along with taking a bag of wool or other fiber (not the kind you eat), and then turning that fiber into something I can then knit or crochet with!  Not only does it create a beautiful finished product, but the process of spinning itself is just as therapeutic and meditative as knitting or crocheting (and I find myself doing almost EVERY DAY!).  So, you can guess that along with learning to spin my own yarn… I also wanted to learn to DYE my own yarn!  It’s like opening a whole new Pandora’s Box of creativity for me right now, and I just can’t seem to stop!

You do not have to be a YARN SPINNER to dye your own yarn too, and there are a number of methods you can use to dye ROVING/WOOL or YARN as well (NATURAL dyes, CHEMICAL dyes (procion) for non animal fibers, or KoolAid and other ACID DYES for animal fibers).  Today I am going to be discussing the Kool-Aid specific method of acid dying for yarn and roving, as well as providing links to other ways you can use Kool-Aid in your crafts at home.

Kool-Aid Colors, google image search

What will Kool-Aid dye work with?  Kool-Aid is an acid dye (it contains CITRIC ACID so you don’t need to add any vinegar or acid unless you want to) so it works great on PROTEIN FIBERS.  Protein fibers include animal fibers (wool, alpaca, cashmere, silk, angora, etc).  If you don’t want your fiber to FELT you should use a SUPERWASH fiber (like superwash merino) or take extra precaution to not agitate your fiber, as well as cool it properly before rinsing.  You can also use any commercial yarn that will accept an acid dye (un-dyed protein based).  I was able to dye cotton which is NOT a protein fiber, however, I purchased it treated to be able to accept non-chemical dyes (and I only mention it because I used it in my tutorial here, treated cotton will work the same as a protein fiber).

What are the PRO’s of Kool-Aid Dye?  Kool-Aid is a food item so it is also NON-TOXIC!  Not only will you be able to use your pots/pans after dying with it, but if you have sensitive skin or are making something for a baby, Kool-Aid is the ideal dye to use.  There are a lot of VIBRANT COLORS available to use, and… Kool-Aid is pretty INEXPENSIVE (at about 10 to 20 cents a pouch, which goes a long way).  It also works pretty quickly, does not bleed if exhausted properly, and leaves your yarn smelling pretty tasty for a while after you dye!

What are the CON’s of Kool-Aid Dye?  Honestly, not many.  The only con’s I can think of are that it only works on protein fiber or treated fiber (so it will not work on things like untreated cotton, bamboo, flax, hemp, acrylic, and other non-animal items); as well as the fact that you are sort of limited in the colors you can create with KoolAid (creating neutral tones would not be ideal).  Other than that I love Kool-Aid dye and highly recommend using it!

What do I need to get started?

  • Protein based yarn, roving, or felt.  (Or, a non-protein fiber that is specially treated to be dyed).
  • Some large pots and pans (if you wish to immerse your fiber in a boiling pan).  This is ideal for dying yarn a single color, and I would recommend using a fiber that will not felt easily.  For this method I used a superwash merino roving.  You will also want something to stir the yarn or roving with (gently), like a plastic spoon or stick.
  • If you wish to HAND PAINT your yarn or roving you will need plastic wrap, some squirt bottles or a turkey baster to pour the dye with (I did not have these, so I carefully poured with spouted measuring cups), and you will need a large microwave-safe dish.
  • Measuring cups to mix your Kool-Aid in
  • Gloves (be sure to wear them throughout the entire process  of both methods so that you do not dye your hands)
  • Don’t forget the packets of unsweetened Kool-Aid (you can also add vinegar or citric acid to the mix, but this is not even necessary.  Some believe it makes the dye more vibrant, I don’t really think it makes a difference).

Immersion Dying: Like mentioned, this method works best for dying yarn a solid or semi solid color.  You will also want to use a yarn that will not felt easily, or you should take extra precaution to not agitate (mix it up too much) the yarn/wool… as well as be sure to cool the wool entirely before you rinse it (and you will want to rinse in a water that is the same temperature as your wool when you are done).  Here are the basic STEPS:

  1. Rinse your yarn/roving in lukewarm water.  
  2. Mix the desired amount of Kool-Aid with water in each pan you plan to use.  Try to use enough water to cover your yarn when you immerse it.  If you want a vibrant color use more than one packet of Kool-Aid, if you want a lighter color use one packet or less.  It works best to mix the Kool-Aid up in the water before you immerse your yarn/roving.
  3. Immerse your yarn/roving into the dye pot (you can use the plastic spoon/stick to push the yarn down or GENTLY stir).
  4. Slowly bring the pot to just starting to boil, remove heat, cover and let it sit for 20-30 minutes.
    Pink Lemonade flavor

    Pink Lemonade flavor

    Cherry Flavor

    Cherry Flavor

    Grape flavor

    Grape flavor

     

     

  5. Check if the dye has EXHAUSTED (gently lift up the yarn or roving… if the remaining water in the pot is clear, then your dye has exhausted… meaning all of the color is now in your yarn/fiber).  If the dye has not exhausted, you will want to gently heat it a little longer until all of the dye takes up.
  6. Cool your yarn/fiber as much as possible, and then rinse it in water of the same temperature.
  7. Once you have rinsed your yarn, gently squeeze it to remove excess water (DO NOT TWIST or WRING).  If the yarn/fiber is still pretty wet, you can place it inside of a folded towel and step on the towel to remove excess water.
  8. Hang your yarn/fiber to dry!  It’s that easy!

Hand-painted Dying: This method works great for adding multiple or variegated colors to your yarn.

  1. Mix desired colors of Kool-Aid (with some water, I didn’t do exact measurements… maybe 1/2 a cup) separately in measuring cups.  Remember to use more than one packet for vibrant colors, and 1 or less for very light colors.

    Colors shown are Orange, Lemonade, and Pink Lemonade

    Colors shown are Orange, Lemonade, and Pink Lemonade

  2. Rinse your yarn/fiber in lukewarm water and gently squeeze to remove excess water (do not twist or wring).
  3. Lay out a couple of sheets of plastic wrap on your counter top or flat surface (being sure to leave no open spaces for the dye to run through).
  4. Arrange your yarn or roving on the plastic wrap (you will want to go in a back and forth pattern and should try to keep the ends semi close together… even touching). 
  5. Pour your Kool-Aid colors into separate squeeze bottles, or use a turkey baster to apply colors to the yarn/fiber.  I did not have these, so I just poured carefully from my measuring cups.
  6. Apply the colors to your yarn/fiber in any design or pattern that you like.  You do not need to soak the yarn or fiber in the dye… it will spread considerably when you microwave it.

    Do not soak the yarn or roving, you will notice how much it spreads when removed from the microwave!

    Do not soak the yarn or roving, you will notice how much it spreads when removed from the microwave!

  7. Once your colors are applied, gently push on the yarn and fiber to help the yarn soak up more dye.  (You will really need gloves at this point).
  8. Wrap up your yarn/fiber in the plastic wrap that you placed it on. 
  9. Place wrapped yarn inside of a microwave safe dish.

    This is another batch, I did not get a picture of the orange/pink/yellow in the dish (sorry)

    This is another batch, I did not get a picture of the orange/pink/yellow in the dish (sorry)

  10. Microwave for 2-5 minutes (depending on how much yarn/fiber you used… it doesn’t take long).

    See how beautifully the color spread out?!  Love it!

    See how beautifully the color spread out?! Love it!

  11. Let the yarn cool, remove plastic wrap and then gently rinse yarn (being careful again to use water of the same temperature and not twisting/wringing your yarn).  You can also use the towel method described in the immersion method to remove excess water.  Then you can hang the yarn/fiber out to dry.

I had so much fun dying my roving with Kool-Aid, making yarn, and then knitting stuff up with my awesome yarn!  Here are just a few of my yarns and projects I made!

My boys named this yarn Unicorn Poop

My boys named this yarn Unicorn Poop

I made up the pattern for these Fingerless Mitts with the Unicorn Poop

I made up the pattern for these Fingerless Mitts with the Unicorn Poop

Some cherry, pink lemonade and white cotton

Some cherry, pink lemonade and white cotton

This is the orange, pink, and yellow handpainted cotton discussed above

This is the orange, pink, and yellow handpainted cotton discussed above

 

Here are some additional resources for dying with Kool-Aid!

 

ENJOY!!!

 

 

 

Sassy Spring Blouse

Sassy Spring Blouse

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

It was about two years ago that I first saw this Sassy Spring Blouse.  Not even wanting to learn to knit, I came across the book Knits Extraordinare by Lena Maikon at the craft store.  Every single pattern in that book was STUNNING!  This top in particular was so UNIQUE with it’s elongated stitches, the horizontal tuck pattern, the gorgeous neck shaping, and the general way in which the top draped on the model… it was EVERYTHING I ever wanted in a top!  I bought the book that instant with the idea that I could learn to knit in a few days and then make this top, how hard could it be right?

Image from Google image search

Image from Google image search

A little harder than I thought, apparently!  I FAILED at this top… having really only learned the knit and purl stitch just a few days prior to trying this…  But that’s OK!  Fast forward to a week ago (and LOTS OF KNITTING PRACTICE IN BETWEEN)…

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

SUCCESS!  I completed my gorgeous top, and I absolutely LOVE it!!  I also love how the back of the top dips low to reveal the upper back… very pretty!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

This top calls for 6-8 skeins of Bernat Bamboo yarn (I used Ivory), as well as one H7 (5mm) crochet hook and size 6.5mm 24″ circular knitting needles.  The top was very easy to make now that I have had some experience knitting… you will want to know the knit stitch, purl stitch, how to increase (or M1), and some familiarity with drop stitches as well as some practice with working a tuck stitch.  Also, the YARN used for this project is incredibly soft and has great drape to it… I loved it so much I bout 6 extra skeins!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

I was pretty surprised that I could not find this (or most of the patterns from the book) in the Ravelry queue!  WHY?  HOW?  The patterns in this book are really worth checking out!  If you want this pattern, you have to buy the book (totally worth it).  You can find it HERE on Amazon for about $20 (or even used for way less than that).  I hope you give this pattern a try, Enjoy!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

 

Date Night Top

Knitting: The Date Night Top

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© positivelylace

I know the weather around the country has been insane this past week, but I am fortunate to live in SUNNY Southern California… and well, it’s been GORGEOUS outside ever since Christmas!  So nice, that I have been eyeing a few tops I wanted to make for this Spring!  If you follow me on facebook, you probably saw that I started another top as well last week… even though I did not have enough yarn for it.  While waiting for the rest of the yarn to come in for my other top, I found this STUNNING Date Night top, a FREE knitting pattern from Knitty.com!

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© positivelylace

I already spent a ton of my money on yarn this month, so I wanted to make something out of my stash yarn… luckily I had enough Patons Silk Bamboo yarn, and saw that others on Ravelry had used this yarn as well.  And it’s projects like this one, which remind me just how lucky we are to have a site like Ravelry!!!  A LOT of other people described that the pattern SIZING was a bit off… well, WAY OFF (too small to be exact).  I am sure that if I were using the exact same type of yarn indicated in the pattern, I probably would not have this issue… but I’m using what I have.  Most of the projects came out TWO SIZES TOO SMALL for others, so I decided to make mine in a size LARGE 42″ chest (I’m typically a small/medium 34″-36″)… AND, I used size 6 needles throughout.

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

The top itself looks really difficult due to the intricate lace pattern, however, they included a chart with the pattern… and it was SURPRISINGLY EASY to knit!!!  The only mistake I made was that I initially followed diagram B (for size 3x)… but one of my skeins of yarn had a bunch of knots in it, so it wasn’t too bad having to rip out those 15 rows (I guess).  So, please make sure you are following the correct diagram for your size!  Other than that, I did not mess up even one small part of this top (SHOCKING!!!!).

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© positivelylace

I am absolutely IN LOVE with this top!  Seriously, I want to knit another one (maybe a size medium next time) and turn it into a dress (SEXY!!!).  And, this yarn is just INCREDIBLE!  It is 70% Bamboo & 30% Silk, extremely soft and shiny, and has an amazing drape to it!  I HIGHLY RECOMMEND making this BEAUTIFUL FREE PATTERN.  My only suggestion is that you have experience knitting in the round, working a yoke, as well as know your basic stitches (knit, purl, how to make 1, and how to decrease).  Enjoy!

City Girl Chevron Cowl

Crochet: City Girl Chevron Cowl

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© positivelylace

It has been a few months since I actually crocheted something, knitting (unexpectedly) took over my hands for the past few months.  So, to honor my first love, crochet, I decided I wanted to make something cute and easy to wear out this winter.  I quickly found the very simple FREE pattern for a crochet infinity scarf HERE from Crochet by J, and got right to business.

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© positivelylace

The first cowl I made was black and grey using Loops & Threads Wool to Wash yarn (100% wool), and a size I/9 (5.50 mm) crochet hook.  This yarn in itself is soft and gorgeous… it looks like a single ply homespun wool actually, and I love that it can be washed without too much stress!

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© positivelylace

For the first cowl, I did not follow the instructions to seam the ends together with a slip stitch, and opted to just seam using a tapestry needle.  For the second cowl I made, I used the same grey yarn (Loops & Threads Wool to Wash) and instead of black, chose Vickie Howell’s Sheepish yarn in white-ish (70% acrylic, 30% wool).

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© positivelylace

I decided to try the slip-stitch seam on the second cowl, and it worked just as well (except that it creates a ridge on the wrong side… in case that matters to you, barely noticeable).  For both cowls, I single crocheted along the edges of each side to give it a finished look (as well as to hide the yarn I carried over for color changes).  I alternated colors to match the row colors in the black and grey cowl, but just used white for the second cowl (to give you an idea of how you can customize your cowl further).  Below is a picture showing how to seam your cowl together using the slip-stitch method (you can also read Crochet from J’s site for more information/pictures).

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© positivelylace

These cowls are really pretty, and I loved crocheting the chevron stitch pattern.  I definitely recommend this pattern for any level, you just need to now how to do a double-crochet, double-crochet 3 together, single crochet, and slip stitch (EASY).  Enjoy!!