Handsome Little Boy Vest

Little Fella’s

©positivelylace

©positivelylace

It’s not often that I make something for little boys.  Even though I have two of my own, they don’t really get super excited about a hand-knit or crocheted item (except for minion hats which I swear I will get to at some point!).  Case in point, here is my five year old trying on the knit vest…

Austin modeling the vest ©positivelylace

Austin modeling the vest ©positivelylace

Regardless, I had recently met this AMAZING woman through one of my groups on facebook.  She is so incredibly kind and sends massive amounts of alpaca wool (from her own farm, Liberty Hill Farm)  for me to spin FREE!!  I in turn send her something that I have knit or crocheted, it’s a win-win situation as we call it.  She has a little grandson also, so I wanted to make something special that he could wear to family gatherings, Church, or even just playing around the house and this little vest was just what I was looking for.

The FREE knitting pattern is called A Little Textured Vest from Joji Locatelli,  and it was really straightforward and easy to knit up.  It is knit in two pieces but can easily be adjusted to knit in the round.  For my vest I used Wool Ease yarn in Oxford Grey (about a ball and a half) as well as US 6 and US 7 needles.  Her grandson is about to turn 3 so I made him the size 4 to give him room to grow (it even fit my very small 5 year old son).  The only thing I changed was which side of the vest was “right side“… I liked the look of the wrong side better so I flipped them around when I seamed the vest.

©positivelylace

©positivelylace

The vest turned out SO CUTE, and was a perfect reminder that even knitting for boys can be adorable and fun!  She loved the vest and it felt so nice to make such a sweet person so happy.  I hope you will try out this vest pattern for your little man as well!  Enjoy!

Austin modeling the vest ©positivelylace

Austin modeling the vest ©positivelylace

The Naughty Deer Hat

Naughty Naughty!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

A while ago I was browsing through my knitting pages on Facebook and I came across a hat.  It was so pretty… fair isle knitted with these cute reindeer on it!  The girl who had made the hat had casually asked us in the group if we thought the “stars” in the background were “too much” … and I did not even SEE it until I looked at the comments for the hat.  The deer, they are making a Bambi!

I knew instantly I had to make this hat!  For that rugged, bearded, brawny woodsman of a man in my life… er, if I had one haha.  I’m not going to lie, I would totally make this hat for myself and rock it!  However, I have two children under the age of 10 and I think the other moms might think their childish behavior is a result of my parenting style (giggles).

So I made this hat for my friend Andrew, of course, after carefully removing the “male” antlers from the female deer in the pattern.

Original chart showing the female deer with antlers © positivelylace

Original chart showing the female deer with antlers
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Here is how I made the female deer less "male" :) © positivelylace

Here is how I made the female deer less “male” :)
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The basic chart pattern is from Anne Rutten and is called the Fornicating Deer Chart (click the link to get the chart).  I made the hat with the chart as follows:

For this hat I used Wool-Ease Solids yarn in Oxford Grey for the main color, and Vicki Howell’s Sheep(ish) yarn in white-ish for the contrast color.

Using  size 2 (2.75mm) circular needles for the ribbing, and size 6 (4.0mm) circulars and DPN’s (double pointed needles) for the remainder of the hat.

CO 96 sts (main color, smaller needles)

work 1.5″ 2×2 ribbing

K one row, change to larger needles

K 33 rows of the chart pattern via fair isle (stranded knitting) technique (towards the end I added in some intermittent stars to break up my long strands, you can do this too if you like though it’s not necessary)

Begin decreasing by:

K6, K2Tog knit any extra stitches left before marker at end of round.
Knit next row all the way around.
K5, K2Tog
Knit next row all the way around

Continue to decrease in this manner until last row is K2tog all the way around. When left with approximately 8 stitches on needle, run yarn through stitches and pull through center opening

Sew in your loose ends

Here is a link to help you understand Fair Isle knitting if  you are new to it like I was.  Below you can see how I held my two strands of yarn and only picked up the color I needed for each stich, below that you can see how the other yarn will become “stranded” behind the knitted work (as seen from the backside of your work).  

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

This hat was a blast to knit, and I’m really happy that my friend liked it.  I hope you will give this hat a try as well!  Enjoy!

Dying Yarn and Roving… With Kool-Aid!

Fun with Kool-Aid!

Google Image, KoolAid Logo

Google Image, KoolAid Logo

It’s been a while since my last blog… I’ve been knitting, designing knits, and I’ve also been making my very own homespun yarn!  I can’t express the SATISFACTION that I get as a crafty person/crocheter/knitter… that comes along with taking a bag of wool or other fiber (not the kind you eat), and then turning that fiber into something I can then knit or crochet with!  Not only does it create a beautiful finished product, but the process of spinning itself is just as therapeutic and meditative as knitting or crocheting (and I find myself doing almost EVERY DAY!).  So, you can guess that along with learning to spin my own yarn… I also wanted to learn to DYE my own yarn!  It’s like opening a whole new Pandora’s Box of creativity for me right now, and I just can’t seem to stop!

You do not have to be a YARN SPINNER to dye your own yarn too, and there are a number of methods you can use to dye ROVING/WOOL or YARN as well (NATURAL dyes, CHEMICAL dyes (procion) for non animal fibers, or KoolAid and other ACID DYES for animal fibers).  Today I am going to be discussing the Kool-Aid specific method of acid dying for yarn and roving, as well as providing links to other ways you can use Kool-Aid in your crafts at home.

Kool-Aid Colors, google image search

What will Kool-Aid dye work with?  Kool-Aid is an acid dye (it contains CITRIC ACID so you don’t need to add any vinegar or acid unless you want to) so it works great on PROTEIN FIBERS.  Protein fibers include animal fibers (wool, alpaca, cashmere, silk, angora, etc).  If you don’t want your fiber to FELT you should use a SUPERWASH fiber (like superwash merino) or take extra precaution to not agitate your fiber, as well as cool it properly before rinsing.  You can also use any commercial yarn that will accept an acid dye (un-dyed protein based).  I was able to dye cotton which is NOT a protein fiber, however, I purchased it treated to be able to accept non-chemical dyes (and I only mention it because I used it in my tutorial here, treated cotton will work the same as a protein fiber).

What are the PRO’s of Kool-Aid Dye?  Kool-Aid is a food item so it is also NON-TOXIC!  Not only will you be able to use your pots/pans after dying with it, but if you have sensitive skin or are making something for a baby, Kool-Aid is the ideal dye to use.  There are a lot of VIBRANT COLORS available to use, and… Kool-Aid is pretty INEXPENSIVE (at about 10 to 20 cents a pouch, which goes a long way).  It also works pretty quickly, does not bleed if exhausted properly, and leaves your yarn smelling pretty tasty for a while after you dye!

What are the CON’s of Kool-Aid Dye?  Honestly, not many.  The only con’s I can think of are that it only works on protein fiber or treated fiber (so it will not work on things like untreated cotton, bamboo, flax, hemp, acrylic, and other non-animal items); as well as the fact that you are sort of limited in the colors you can create with KoolAid (creating neutral tones would not be ideal).  Other than that I love Kool-Aid dye and highly recommend using it!

What do I need to get started?

  • Protein based yarn, roving, or felt.  (Or, a non-protein fiber that is specially treated to be dyed).
  • Some large pots and pans (if you wish to immerse your fiber in a boiling pan).  This is ideal for dying yarn a single color, and I would recommend using a fiber that will not felt easily.  For this method I used a superwash merino roving.  You will also want something to stir the yarn or roving with (gently), like a plastic spoon or stick.
  • If you wish to HAND PAINT your yarn or roving you will need plastic wrap, some squirt bottles or a turkey baster to pour the dye with (I did not have these, so I carefully poured with spouted measuring cups), and you will need a large microwave-safe dish.
  • Measuring cups to mix your Kool-Aid in
  • Gloves (be sure to wear them throughout the entire process  of both methods so that you do not dye your hands)
  • Don’t forget the packets of unsweetened Kool-Aid (you can also add vinegar or citric acid to the mix, but this is not even necessary.  Some believe it makes the dye more vibrant, I don’t really think it makes a difference).

Immersion Dying: Like mentioned, this method works best for dying yarn a solid or semi solid color.  You will also want to use a yarn that will not felt easily, or you should take extra precaution to not agitate (mix it up too much) the yarn/wool… as well as be sure to cool the wool entirely before you rinse it (and you will want to rinse in a water that is the same temperature as your wool when you are done).  Here are the basic STEPS:

  1. Rinse your yarn/roving in lukewarm water.  
  2. Mix the desired amount of Kool-Aid with water in each pan you plan to use.  Try to use enough water to cover your yarn when you immerse it.  If you want a vibrant color use more than one packet of Kool-Aid, if you want a lighter color use one packet or less.  It works best to mix the Kool-Aid up in the water before you immerse your yarn/roving.
  3. Immerse your yarn/roving into the dye pot (you can use the plastic spoon/stick to push the yarn down or GENTLY stir).
  4. Slowly bring the pot to just starting to boil, remove heat, cover and let it sit for 20-30 minutes.
    Pink Lemonade flavor

    Pink Lemonade flavor

    Cherry Flavor

    Cherry Flavor

    Grape flavor

    Grape flavor

     

     

  5. Check if the dye has EXHAUSTED (gently lift up the yarn or roving… if the remaining water in the pot is clear, then your dye has exhausted… meaning all of the color is now in your yarn/fiber).  If the dye has not exhausted, you will want to gently heat it a little longer until all of the dye takes up.
  6. Cool your yarn/fiber as much as possible, and then rinse it in water of the same temperature.
  7. Once you have rinsed your yarn, gently squeeze it to remove excess water (DO NOT TWIST or WRING).  If the yarn/fiber is still pretty wet, you can place it inside of a folded towel and step on the towel to remove excess water.
  8. Hang your yarn/fiber to dry!  It’s that easy!

Hand-painted Dying: This method works great for adding multiple or variegated colors to your yarn.

  1. Mix desired colors of Kool-Aid (with some water, I didn’t do exact measurements… maybe 1/2 a cup) separately in measuring cups.  Remember to use more than one packet for vibrant colors, and 1 or less for very light colors.

    Colors shown are Orange, Lemonade, and Pink Lemonade

    Colors shown are Orange, Lemonade, and Pink Lemonade

  2. Rinse your yarn/fiber in lukewarm water and gently squeeze to remove excess water (do not twist or wring).
  3. Lay out a couple of sheets of plastic wrap on your counter top or flat surface (being sure to leave no open spaces for the dye to run through).
  4. Arrange your yarn or roving on the plastic wrap (you will want to go in a back and forth pattern and should try to keep the ends semi close together… even touching). 
  5. Pour your Kool-Aid colors into separate squeeze bottles, or use a turkey baster to apply colors to the yarn/fiber.  I did not have these, so I just poured carefully from my measuring cups.
  6. Apply the colors to your yarn/fiber in any design or pattern that you like.  You do not need to soak the yarn or fiber in the dye… it will spread considerably when you microwave it.

    Do not soak the yarn or roving, you will notice how much it spreads when removed from the microwave!

    Do not soak the yarn or roving, you will notice how much it spreads when removed from the microwave!

  7. Once your colors are applied, gently push on the yarn and fiber to help the yarn soak up more dye.  (You will really need gloves at this point).
  8. Wrap up your yarn/fiber in the plastic wrap that you placed it on. 
  9. Place wrapped yarn inside of a microwave safe dish.

    This is another batch, I did not get a picture of the orange/pink/yellow in the dish (sorry)

    This is another batch, I did not get a picture of the orange/pink/yellow in the dish (sorry)

  10. Microwave for 2-5 minutes (depending on how much yarn/fiber you used… it doesn’t take long).

    See how beautifully the color spread out?!  Love it!

    See how beautifully the color spread out?! Love it!

  11. Let the yarn cool, remove plastic wrap and then gently rinse yarn (being careful again to use water of the same temperature and not twisting/wringing your yarn).  You can also use the towel method described in the immersion method to remove excess water.  Then you can hang the yarn/fiber out to dry.

I had so much fun dying my roving with Kool-Aid, making yarn, and then knitting stuff up with my awesome yarn!  Here are just a few of my yarns and projects I made!

My boys named this yarn Unicorn Poop

My boys named this yarn Unicorn Poop

I made up the pattern for these Fingerless Mitts with the Unicorn Poop

I made up the pattern for these Fingerless Mitts with the Unicorn Poop

Some cherry, pink lemonade and white cotton

Some cherry, pink lemonade and white cotton

This is the orange, pink, and yellow handpainted cotton discussed above

This is the orange, pink, and yellow handpainted cotton discussed above

 

Here are some additional resources for dying with Kool-Aid!

 

ENJOY!!!

 

 

 

Sassy Spring Blouse

Sassy Spring Blouse

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© positivelylace

It was about two years ago that I first saw this Sassy Spring Blouse.  Not even wanting to learn to knit, I came across the book Knits Extraordinare by Lena Maikon at the craft store.  Every single pattern in that book was STUNNING!  This top in particular was so UNIQUE with it’s elongated stitches, the horizontal tuck pattern, the gorgeous neck shaping, and the general way in which the top draped on the model… it was EVERYTHING I ever wanted in a top!  I bought the book that instant with the idea that I could learn to knit in a few days and then make this top, how hard could it be right?

Image from Google image search

Image from Google image search

A little harder than I thought, apparently!  I FAILED at this top… having really only learned the knit and purl stitch just a few days prior to trying this…  But that’s OK!  Fast forward to a week ago (and LOTS OF KNITTING PRACTICE IN BETWEEN)…

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

SUCCESS!  I completed my gorgeous top, and I absolutely LOVE it!!  I also love how the back of the top dips low to reveal the upper back… very pretty!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

This top calls for 6-8 skeins of Bernat Bamboo yarn (I used Ivory), as well as one H7 (5mm) crochet hook and size 6.5mm 24″ circular knitting needles.  The top was very easy to make now that I have had some experience knitting… you will want to know the knit stitch, purl stitch, how to increase (or M1), and some familiarity with drop stitches as well as some practice with working a tuck stitch.  Also, the YARN used for this project is incredibly soft and has great drape to it… I loved it so much I bout 6 extra skeins!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

I was pretty surprised that I could not find this (or most of the patterns from the book) in the Ravelry queue!  WHY?  HOW?  The patterns in this book are really worth checking out!  If you want this pattern, you have to buy the book (totally worth it).  You can find it HERE on Amazon for about $20 (or even used for way less than that).  I hope you give this pattern a try, Enjoy!

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© positivelylace

 

Date Night Top

Knitting: The Date Night Top

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© positivelylace

I know the weather around the country has been insane this past week, but I am fortunate to live in SUNNY Southern California… and well, it’s been GORGEOUS outside ever since Christmas!  So nice, that I have been eyeing a few tops I wanted to make for this Spring!  If you follow me on facebook, you probably saw that I started another top as well last week… even though I did not have enough yarn for it.  While waiting for the rest of the yarn to come in for my other top, I found this STUNNING Date Night top, a FREE knitting pattern from Knitty.com!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

I already spent a ton of my money on yarn this month, so I wanted to make something out of my stash yarn… luckily I had enough Patons Silk Bamboo yarn, and saw that others on Ravelry had used this yarn as well.  And it’s projects like this one, which remind me just how lucky we are to have a site like Ravelry!!!  A LOT of other people described that the pattern SIZING was a bit off… well, WAY OFF (too small to be exact).  I am sure that if I were using the exact same type of yarn indicated in the pattern, I probably would not have this issue… but I’m using what I have.  Most of the projects came out TWO SIZES TOO SMALL for others, so I decided to make mine in a size LARGE 42″ chest (I’m typically a small/medium 34″-36″)… AND, I used size 6 needles throughout.

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

The top itself looks really difficult due to the intricate lace pattern, however, they included a chart with the pattern… and it was SURPRISINGLY EASY to knit!!!  The only mistake I made was that I initially followed diagram B (for size 3x)… but one of my skeins of yarn had a bunch of knots in it, so it wasn’t too bad having to rip out those 15 rows (I guess).  So, please make sure you are following the correct diagram for your size!  Other than that, I did not mess up even one small part of this top (SHOCKING!!!!).

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

I am absolutely IN LOVE with this top!  Seriously, I want to knit another one (maybe a size medium next time) and turn it into a dress (SEXY!!!).  And, this yarn is just INCREDIBLE!  It is 70% Bamboo & 30% Silk, extremely soft and shiny, and has an amazing drape to it!  I HIGHLY RECOMMEND making this BEAUTIFUL FREE PATTERN.  My only suggestion is that you have experience knitting in the round, working a yoke, as well as know your basic stitches (knit, purl, how to make 1, and how to decrease).  Enjoy!

City Girl Chevron Cowl

Crochet: City Girl Chevron Cowl

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© positivelylace

It has been a few months since I actually crocheted something, knitting (unexpectedly) took over my hands for the past few months.  So, to honor my first love, crochet, I decided I wanted to make something cute and easy to wear out this winter.  I quickly found the very simple FREE pattern for a crochet infinity scarf HERE from Crochet by J, and got right to business.

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

The first cowl I made was black and grey using Loops & Threads Wool to Wash yarn (100% wool), and a size I/9 (5.50 mm) crochet hook.  This yarn in itself is soft and gorgeous… it looks like a single ply homespun wool actually, and I love that it can be washed without too much stress!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

For the first cowl, I did not follow the instructions to seam the ends together with a slip stitch, and opted to just seam using a tapestry needle.  For the second cowl I made, I used the same grey yarn (Loops & Threads Wool to Wash) and instead of black, chose Vickie Howell’s Sheepish yarn in white-ish (70% acrylic, 30% wool).

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

I decided to try the slip-stitch seam on the second cowl, and it worked just as well (except that it creates a ridge on the wrong side… in case that matters to you, barely noticeable).  For both cowls, I single crocheted along the edges of each side to give it a finished look (as well as to hide the yarn I carried over for color changes).  I alternated colors to match the row colors in the black and grey cowl, but just used white for the second cowl (to give you an idea of how you can customize your cowl further).  Below is a picture showing how to seam your cowl together using the slip-stitch method (you can also read Crochet from J’s site for more information/pictures).

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© positivelylace

These cowls are really pretty, and I loved crocheting the chevron stitch pattern.  I definitely recommend this pattern for any level, you just need to now how to do a double-crochet, double-crochet 3 together, single crochet, and slip stitch (EASY).  Enjoy!!

 

Winter in Paris Sweater

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Hello again! I hope you all are enjoying the Holiday Season wherever you are! I’ve had so much going on lately from home remodels to getting my online shop up and running, that I felt the need to escape to a magical and romantic winter wonderland!! Well, not really escape… But a girl can dream, right?

I’ve always been in love with Paris, though I’ve never actually been there. I’ve also always had this idea of the perfect French-girl sweater… Off the shoulder, striped, and very sexy! I was so thrilled when I found the free knitting pattern, $5 in Paris, on ravelry as it was almost exactly what I was looking for!

The pattern is a very simple, seamless, top-down raglan construction that also calls for very inexpensive acrylic yarn (Caron Simply Soft, approx 2.3 skeins). I decided I wanted something with a bit more stretch as well as fuzzy warmth, so I used two wool blends: Vickie Howell’s Sheep-ish yarn (2.5 skeins in white-ish), and Lion Brand Wool-Ease (2 skeins, in Oxford grey).

The pattern calls for both size 8 and 9 24″ circular needles, as well as a set of size 8 double pointed needles (used for knitting the sleeves seamlessly).

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I have to tell you… I was really scared to try using DPN’s (double pointed needles) because they just, well… They look crazy!!! I thought knitting with four needles would give me a heart attack, and it almost did a few times… But it wasn’t as bad as I imagined, AND my sleeves came out perfectly seamless. I was so proud of myself after I completed my sleeves, and it just goes to show that you can and you should ALWAYS try something new! HERE is a video that helped me understand the process.

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I followed the waist shaping indicated in the pattern, but decided to make my sleeves about 3/4 length (instead of short sleeve as shown in the pattern). To do that I simply did two decreases ( at the under arm) every 7th row… And added an extra two decreases in the last band of white (before the ribbing).

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I am so pleased with my Parisian sweater, and I really do hope you will make one too! Enjoy, and HAPPY HOLIDAYS!!

The Rocking Chair Wrap

The Rocking Chair Wrap

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© positivelylace

Keeping with the pace of my knitting fever, I have been working a lot of LARGE KNITTING (big needles + big yarn = fast progress) lately.  I found the free pattern for this GORGEOUS Rocking Chair Wrap online, and having actually felt the yarn used to make it… I knew that it would make a very COZY and LUSH wrap.

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© positivelylace

This wrap can morph into many things, actually.  It is quite large (approx. 74″ long, 24″wide), and can be used not only as a gorgeous wrap… but also as a very bulky scarf and a cozy throw or lap blanket for your favorite rocking chair!  (Below are some images retrieved from Ravelry, from the pattern designer Louis Chiquette).  My house is undergoing some remodeling work or I would take more pictures of mine…

© chicquette

© chicquette

© chicquette

© chicquette

© chicquette

© chicquette

The pattern calls for size 19 knitting needles, as well as 5 balls of Bernat Baby Blanket (the new version in white, 100% Polyester) yarn… it is a very SOFT, STRETCHY, CUDDLY yarn!

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© positivelylace

I absolutely LOVE this wrap!  I’m going to have this, as well as other items up for sale in my shop… so check back and hopefully I will have it up ASAP!  I also plan on making one or two more of these for Christmas gifts!  It’s such a wonderful and warm wrap, and pretty quick to knit up if you are a beginner to moderate level knitter.  While I would probably wear this as a cozy wrap… I think it would also be perfect for a new mother to rock her baby to sleep!!  Enjoy!

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© positivelylace

 

Oh Scrap! Wraps

Oh Scrap! Wraps

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© positivelylace

If you’ve been following my blog, you know how much I’ve been knitting lately.  Now that I am getting the hang of it and am beginning to knit faster, I really do enjoy doing it!  I have also learned with my last project (The Easy Peasy Scarves) that knitting is a lot FASTER, EASIER, and generally more ENJOYABLE when using BIG NEEDLES!!

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© positivelylace

 Seriously, I don’t know why I tried learning to knit using such small needles… if you are new to knitting here is my advice:  buy a skein of chunky yarn and use larger needles, make a simple scarf or lap throw.  You will be amazed at how much easier it is to learn knitting using larger materials, and you won’t get too discouraged by the amount of time knitting takes (it seriously takes a long time to knit).

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© positivelylace

After I finished my lovely easy scarves I knew I wanted to try my hands at large knitting yet again.  I wanted something that was simple but still pretty, and I also wanted to bust through some of my yarn stash that has been sitting in my closet since last Christmas!  I took a look at Vickie Howell’s website for free patterns, and there it was!  The Oh Scrap! Wrap, I fell in love with the lacy feather and fan look as well as the unique changes in color that she used.  I had to make it!  And after making one in just a few short days, I had to make another one instantly.

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© positivelylace

The first one that I made I decided to use up as much of my Lion Brand Homespun yarn as I could.  I chose purple (gothic), grey (edwardian), and black (black) for the colors and instantly knew that I would be giving this to my cousin (and best friend) who has been battling kidney failure (she loves the darker colors).  This one came out very uniform in texture, and I absolutely love how the darker colors complement each other in the wavy lace pattern.  I named this wrap’s color combination “purple mountain’s majesty.”

I then wanted to make a lighter version wrap and chose to use different types of light colored white and tan yarns.  For the whites in this wrap I used Caron Simply Soft (off white), Vickie Howell Sheepish (white-ish), Lion Brand Homespun (deco), and Patons Silk Bamboo (ivory).  For the tan colors I used Caron Simply Soft (bone), Lion Brand Homespun (rococo), Patons Lace Sequin (amber) *holding two strands together, and Patons Silk Bamboo (almond).  This one turned out beautiful with the varying textures of the yarn as well as the different hues of the two shades.  I named this wrap’s color combination “amber waves of grain.”

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

It takes about one skein of each of these colors for one wrap, so keep in mind that you will be needing a full skein of each yarn from your stash to make this (possibly more if you use less colors).  I also chose to use size 19 needles for my wraps.  I recommend basic knitting skills to make this… knowing a knit stitch, purl stitch, as well as how to yarn over and knit a yarn over stitch.  Also, these should not take more than a few days to a week to complete if you have basic knitting experience.  The most annoying part of this was figuring out how to sew in all the little ends without them showing through the lacy stitches.  I really tied mine in a bunch of times to keep them secure, you can’t see them at all but you can feel the areas where they were tied in (feels a bit bumpy) which is just a bit annoying, but hopefully they won’t come out.

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© positivelylace

These turned out so beautiful, and I might actually be selling the Amber Waves of Grain wrap in my shop soon, possibly many more in the future!  I love this pattern, I think it is super easy to make and is so very creative, thank you Vickie Howell!  Enjoy!

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© positivelylace

UPDATE:  I decided to make yet ANOTHER Scrap Wrap, I call this one the Holly Berry Wrap!  I used one ball of Bernat Soft Boucle (richest red) and one ball of Lion Brand Homespun (candy apple).

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© positivelylace

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

 

 

Easy Peasy Knit Scarves

Easy Peasy Knit Scarves

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© positivelylace

I’ve been in the mood for knitting, after having finished my Letterman sweater that I made a few weeks ago.  With how long it took to complete that sweater, I wanted something simple and fast.  My first thought was a hat, however, I really do not like double-pointed knitting!!  I was browsing through my Knitty Magazine app and found this fantastic tutorial for making a VERY SIMPLE beginner scarf using only the knit stitch (garter stitch is simply knitting every row) as well as the drop stitch.  If you do not know how to knit yet, it’s a wonderful (albeit quite frustrating at first) technique to learn.  Here is a LINK to where you can get some beginner advice on how to knit basic stitches.  Here is another LINK on how to do the drop stitch that will be used with these scarves.

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

To make these scarves even more FAST, I chose to knit them on larger needles.  For the white scarf, I used size 15 circular needles with Vickie Howell Sheepish yarn (in color: white-ish).  For the black scarf I used size 19 circular needles with Bernat Soft Boucle yarn (in black).  Each scarf took about one full day to make, so if you are in need of a quick holiday gift… these are perfect!  I tried to find the link to the video provided in the Knitty Magazine app (it is a free app on iphone), but I am unable to locate it.  I will give the basic instructions below, but please also check out www.Knitty.com for other amazing free patterns!

© positivelylace

© positivelylace

White Scarf

  1. Cast on 20 sts
  2. Work garter stitch for 6 rows (simply knit each row).
  3. Begin the drop stitch:  while knitting in this row, wrap yarn around the needle twice during the knit stitch..
  4. Drop the extra stitches: while knitting in this row, knit into each stitch and when you remove it from the needle allow the added loop to drop off after.  This will create an elongated stitch.  Knit into the next stitch and repeat the process across the row.
  5. Repeat step 2-4 for however long you want your scarf to be.
  6. Bind off, add fringe if you like.
© positivelylace

© positivelylace

Black Scarf

  1. Cast on 14
  2. Work 2 rows of garter stitch (garter stitch is simply knitting each row).
  3. Begin drop stitch by looping the yarn around the needle twice during each knit stitch (same as above).
  4. Drop the extra stitches after knitting each stitch.
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 for the desired length of the scarf.

I love how fast and simple these scarves were to make, they also look really lacy and pretty!  They are perfect for Fall weather and would make an excellent last minute gift this Holiday season!  Enjoy!